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Marine Barracks Washington, D.C.

8th & I

"Oldest Post of the Corps"
Barracks' Videos

A brief video about how the performing 24 of the Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon are chosen.
 Click here for more Barracks' Videos

Barracks News
‘The Commandant’s Own’ passes baton to fifth director in its history

By Staff Sgt. Brian Buckwalter and Lance Cpl. Christian Varney | December 12, 2014

Only five Marines have ever directed “The Commandant’s Own” since its inception in 1934, and each has passed the baton weighted with a responsibility to keep the unit relevant despite changing times. MORE
Finding the Best: Silent Drill School

By Cpl. Miles Manchester | December 02, 2014

Each year, the Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon conducts Silent Drill School from November until the beginning of March in order to select new Marines for the upcoming parade season. MORE
Barracks Marines visit Civil War battlefields

By Lance Cpl. Christian Varney | November 25, 2014

A recent trip to the battle grounds of Antietam near Sharpsburg, Md., by the officers and staff noncommissioned officers of Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., exemplifies that very trait. MORE
Unit Leaders

Sgt. Maj. Joseph Gray
Sergeant Major
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Lt. Col. Justin S. Dunne
Executive Officer
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Col. Benjamin T. Watson
Commanding Officer
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Mission
Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., also known as "8th & I," is the oldest active post in the Marine Corps. It was founded by President Thomas Jefferson and Lt. Col. William Ward Burrows, the third commandant of the Marine Corps, in 1801.

Located on the corners of 8th & I Streets in southeast Washington, D.C., the Barracks supports both ceremonial and security missions in the nation's capital.

The Barracks is home to many nationally recognized units, including the Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon, the Marine Drum and Bugle Corps, the Marine Band, the official Marine Corps Color Guard, and the Marine Corps Body Bearers. It is also the site of the Home of the Commandants, which, along with the Barracks, is a registered national historic landmark.