Photo Information

Capt. Mark Batey, Bravo Company executive office, competes in the kettle-bell and burpee challenge during the High Intensity Tactical Training athlete competition at Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., July 15, 2015. Marine Corps Community Services hosted the first High Intensity Tactical Training athlete competition. The United States Marine Corps HITT program is to improve operation fitness levels and overall combat readiness while reducing the likelihood of injury and ensuring that all Marines are physically prepared for combat.

Photo by Cpl. Skye Davis

Ultimate Tactical Athlete

16 Jul 2015 | Cpl. Skye Davis Marine Barracks

More than 20 Marines competed in the first High Intensity Tactical Training athlete competition hosted by Marine Corps Community Services at Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., July 15, 2015.

The objective of the United States Marine Corps HITT is to improve operation fitness levels and overall combat readiness while reducing the likelihood of injury and ensuring that all Marines are physically prepared for combat.

On the Annex Field Marines participated in seven preliminary events. Each drill was scored based on time: the fastest time was awarded ten points, second-six points, third-three points and all other finishers were awarded one point.

“The main focus to prepare for this competition was mainly endurance and stamina on a daily basis for at least an hour and a half because I knew this was not going to be an easy task,” said Cpl. Raymond Guzman, Colors Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge, H&S Company.

 The first event was the HITT combine challenge which was five events. The Marines competed in the prone three cone drill, the prone pro-agility drill, the kneeling power ball throw, the standing broad jump, and a prone 25-yard dash. Each of the events was a test of agility, change of direction, body control, upper body coordination, strength and power.  

The second event was the 400 yard tactical course for time that consisted of a 100-yard sprint, 100-yard tire flip, 100-yard fireman’s carry and a 100-yard sandbag bear hug carry. The aim of this course is to measure anaerobic and muscular endurance.

“It was more physical than I expected and the course definitely tested my athletic abilities,” said Lance Cpl. Ruben Cruz, team leader, Guard Company..

The last event was the kettle-bell and burpee challenge. Marines performed 10 kettle-bell swings using two hands, followed by burpees. The number of burpees increased by one after every set of kettle-bell swings, the series of exercises ended at 10 burpees.

This was the first time for most Marines here at the Barracks to participate in HITT.

The competition definitely tested my abilities physically and the fireman’s carry portion of the 400-yard tactical course allowed me to evaluate myself to figure what I need to work on after being physically wore out, said Sgt. Michael Williams, Mess Hall Quality Assurance Evaluator, H&S Company.

The top male finisher, Lance Cpl. Brian Evans’, Alpha Co., overall score was 30 points and the top female finisher, Cpl. Alexis Lindsey’s, protocol section, H&S Co., overall score was 70 points.

Both Evans and Lindsey will travel to Marine Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif. to compete in the HITT Ultimate Tactical Athlete finals in September. In the event that the top finisher is unable to attend the finals, the second place finisher will take their place.